DIY Maintenance or Troubleshooting

Although repair and installation of comfort systems should always be left to a Dominick professional, there are several do-it-yourself projects you can tackle around the home.

How to Test Your Heating Oil System


We recommend that you test your heating oil unit before each heating season starts. You don't want to be left out in the cold when winter weather arrives. Just follow these three simple steps:

  1. TURN UP: Make sure the emergency switch is in the "on" position and turn up the thermostat at least 10 degrees higher than the actual room temperature.
  2. TUNE IN: Next, listen carefully. Within a few minutes you should hear your heating oil equipment hum into action.
  3. SWITCH ON: If your heating oil equipment doesn't start up, press the reset button on your heating oil burner's relay. You need only press it once.

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If your heating oil system still doesn't start, ask yourself these questions before calling us for what might be an unnecessary service call:

  • Are the emergency switches off? (There may be two: one at the stairs and one at the boiler.)
  • Did the fuse or circuit breaker for your equipment trip?
  • Is the thermostat set properly?

If your boiler or furnace still won't start, or if it emits an odor or strange sound, call us.

 

What to Do if the Heat Shuts Off


If your heat shuts off at some point during a heating season, don't panic! Before calling Dominick for what might be an unnecessary "no heat" call, don't forget to ask yourself these three simple questions:

  1. Are the emergency switches off? (There may be two: one at the stairs and one at the boiler, and they're usually red in color.)
  2. Did the fuse or circuit breaker for the equipment trip?
  3. Is the thermostat set properly?

If the boiler or furnace still won't start, or if things just don't seem correct, a call to Dominick is in order. You can always count on our emergency service when you need it the most!

How to Check for Air Leaks in Your Home


You don't need to be an experienced "do-it-yourselfer" to improve your home's weather sealing. With a little time and the help of a partner, you can easily detect leaks that let outdoor air infiltrate the home.

Some of the most common trouble spots are:

  • Areas where pipes and wires enter the building
  • Gaps around chimneys
  • Unfinished spaces behind cupboards and closets
  • And any point where different siding materials intersect

The best time to identify leaks is on a day when there is a significant difference between the indoor and outdoor temperatures. Begin by eliminating as much air movement as possible by turning off your heating or air conditioning system (using the thermostat). Shut all doors and windows, and turn on any fans that blow air outside. Then, light an incense stick and pass it in front of all suspected leak areas. Wherever the smoke gets sucked or blown, there is a leak. Mark all the leaky spots, then go back to them and try to find the leak. 

You can confirm the leak at night by turning off the lights and shining a flashlight across the leaking area from the inside while someone stands outside and looks for cracks where the light is detectable.